Students’ perceptions on snake in Northwestern Bangladesh

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M. FIROJ JAMAN
MD. FAZLE RABBE
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3135-2776
MD. MAHABUB ALAM
ASHIKUR RAHMAN SHOME
MD. AFZAL HOSSAIN
MOHAMMAD ABDUR RAZZAQUE SARKER

Abstract

Abstract. Jaman MF, Rabbe MF, Alam MM, Shome AR, Hossain MA, Sarker MAR. 2020. Students’ perceptions on the snake in Northwestern Bangladesh. Asian J Ethnobiol 3: 62-69. Human-snake interaction has an ancestral history with different outcomes at different times. This study was done to assess the student's perceptions of snakes and current superstitions practiced in some areas of northwestern Bangladesh. We interviewed 348 students from 7 educational institutions under 3 districts from January 2019 to April 2019. We asked dichotomous (yes-no) question to know perceptions about snakes and variation among superstitions of the students. We found significant variation in responses concerning the demographic status of the respondents. Religion and education were the most influencing factors affecting the results of students’ perceptions. Among the total respondents, 329 (94.5%) had seen snakes, 182 (52.3%) considered snakes as a notorious animal, 224 (64.4%) considered snakes as an economically harmful animal, 155 (44.5%) think killing snakes giving a good feeling, 313 (90%) believe that snakes attack humans, 321 (92.2%) students have seen others killing snakes, and 127 (36.5%) had killed snakes themselves. Of the five superstitions, “snake can drink milk” was the topmost statement believed by 293 (84.2%) students. Due to these negative attitudes and misconceptions, we assume that snakes are regularly killed, and there is a potential risk for the population to decline.

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