The diversity of macrozoobenthos in the ecosystem of silvofishery mangrove and natural mangrove in the Boe Coast Ecotourism Area, Takalar District, South Sulawesi

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ANGGI AZMITA FIQRIYAH MARPAUNG
INAYAH YASIR
MARZUKI UKKAS

Abstract

Marpaung AAF, Yasir I, Ukkas M. 2014. The diversity of macrozoobenthos in the ecosystem of silvofishery mangrove and natural mangrove in the Boe Coast Ecotourism Area, Takalar District, South Sulawesi. Bonorowo Wetlands 4: 1-11. This study was conducted to determine the diversity of macrozoobenthos in mangrove ecosystems of silvofishery and natural mangroves and to compare the abundance of macrozoobenthos in the two different ecosystems. The study was conducted between December 2012 and February 2013, located in the Mappakalompo Village pond and the estuary area of the Boe Beach Ecotourism Area, Galesong Subdistrict, Takalar District, South Sulawesi. Observations were made on two stations, namely mangrove silvofishery and natural mangroves. Research method is survey method and sampling method, then analyzed in laboratory. The results show that the diversity of macrozoobenthos in both ecosystems is 16 species, in mangrove silvofishery found 5 species divided into 3 species of Gastropoda, 1 species of Bivalvia and 1 species of Maxillopoda; whereas in natural mangroves found 15 species consisting of 6 species of Gastropoda, 7 species of Bivalvia, 1 species of Maxillopoda and 1 species of crustacea. Cerithidea cingulata is the most dominant macrozoobenthos. For macrozoobenthos, silvofishery mangrove ecosystems have high macrozoobenthos abundance (1219/m²), but species diversity is low. Meanwhile, natural mangrove ecosystems have small macrozoobenthos abundance (730/m²) but the number of species is more diverse. For mangroves, natural mangrove ecosystem is more diverse with four species, namely Avicennia sp., Bruguiera sp., Rhizophora mucronata, and Rhizophora stylosa. While, mangrove silvofishery only overgrew two species of mangroves, namely R. mucronata and R. stylosa, both planted by pond farmers.

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