The influence of human activities on wildlife in Kwakuchinja migratory corridor, Tarangire/Manyara Ecosystem, Northern Tanzania

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YUSTIN RICHARD NJAMASI
VEDASTO G. NDIBALEMA
JOHN KIOKO

Abstract

Abstract. Njamasi YR, Ndibalema VG, Kioko J. 2022. The influence of human activities on wildlife in Kwakuchinja migratory corridor, Tarangire/Manyara Ecosystem, Northern Tanzania. Intl J Trop Drylands 6: 26-38. Human population growth in areas adjacent to protected areas is high and has seriously threatened wildlife management across Africa. Local communities around protected areas engage in illegal activities that destroy habitats and threaten wildlife migration routes. Additionally, there is a local extinction of five species of large mammals in Kwakuchinja, Tanzania. Therefore, this study focused on assessing the impact of human activities on wildlife in the Kwakuchinja flyway in the Tarangire-Manyara Ecosystem (TME), Northern Tanzania. The data were collected using Tresect Walk, domestic questionnaires, important informants, and secondary materials. The comparison data of the groups for natural groups were analyzed with the help of Mann Whitney's U-Test man. At the same time, the Pearson test was used to compare relationships between animals in nature, cattle, and human settlements. Additionally, the chi-square test was used to compare the relationship between wildlife status and time spent by the respondent in the study area. The study found that migratory corridors for wildlife had shrunk from five to three. Common wildebeest had the highest density (area of ??450 km2), while Thompon's gazelle had the lowest. Trends in nature from aerial survey data show a 50% decrease in the number of large mammals in the ecosystem in the 2000s compared to the 1990s, and land use has changed to cultivation with a 4.2% increase in 'the study area. An insignificant relationship was observed between the number of wild animals and human settlements (r= 0.714). Therefore, these results suggest that human settlements harm the number and distribution of fauna. Since wildlife and livestock share grazing and watering areas, the study recommends using an integrated land use plan, law enforcement, and sustainable use of natural resources to protect the Kwakuchinja Wildlife Corridor.

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